News tagged with 'social science' Subscribe via RSS

06/25/2019

Can AI Be Fair?

Whitney Clavin
Experts discuss whether machine-learning programs can be unbiased.
Illustration representing the question of whether AI's can be fair.
04/30/2019

This is Your Brain on Fear

Dean Mobbs uses fMRI technology in the Caltech Brain Imaging Center to learn what happens in the brain when people feel threatened. He draws inspiration for his experiments from an unlikely source: horror movies.
preview image for Dean Mobbs video
04/04/2019

Mental Math and Life Stories

Hamed Hamze (MS ’10) uses math to study how people make decisions. As a graduate student in economics, he models scenarios ranging from the hypothetical to real-world social choices such as voting.
Hamed Hamze
03/01/2019

Finding New Applications for Economics

Emily Velasco
Charlie Plott's latest research looks at the bus systems that transport disabled students to school in Australia.
A portrait of Charlie Plott
02/08/2019

Antonio Rangel Receives NOMIS Distinguished Scientist and Scholar Award

Emily Velasco
Antonio Rangel is a recipient of the 2018 Distinguished Scientist and Scholar Award from NOMIS, a Swiss organization that promotes innovative interdisciplinary research.
A portrait of Antonio Rangel. He wears glasses and a blue polo. Green trees are in the background
01/24/2019

Synthetic Chemistry Takes Anti-Cancer Compounds out of the Sea Slug and into the Lab

Emily Velasco
A research team led by Brian Stoltz has invented a new method for creating the bis-THIQ class of compounds.
A black-and-white sea slug crawls over an ocean bottom.
01/07/2019

Watson Lecture Preview: The Long-Run Behavior of Random Walks

Omer Tamuz, this year’s Biedebach Memorial Lecturer, will describe some classical results from random walk research and a surprising connection to economics.
photo of Omer Tamuz
11/20/2018

Is Science In Trouble?

Emily Velasco
In recent years, researchers have begun finding that the results of many scientific studies cannot be replicated, throwing into question their validity.
A graphic showing a scientist looking into a microscope. The image is duplicated four times, with each copy becoming more obscured than the last
10/31/2018

Dams and the Damage They Do

Emily Velasco
Ted Scudder has spent over six decades studying the impacts large dams have on rivers, on the people displaced by them, and on the countries that built them. During that time, he's come to see them causing more harm than good. He's published a new book explaining why.
Ted Scudder, professor emeritus of anthropology, stands in his office. He is surrounded by file folders, books, and artifacts.
10/01/2018

Scientists Uncover Why You Can't Decide What to Order for Lunch

Emily Velasco
Caltech researchers explore the choice overload effect, a phenomenon that hampers the brain's ability to make a decision when there are too many options.
A cartoon sketch of a man standing confused in front of shelves with many items.
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