News RSS Icon Subscribe via RSS

Caltech-Led Researchers Find Negative Cues from Appearance Alone Matter for Real Elections
10/29/2008

Caltech-Led Researchers Find Negative Cues from Appearance Alone Matter for Real Elections

Kathy Svitil
Brain-imaging studies reveal that voting decisions are more associated with the brain's response to negative aspects of a politician's appearance than to positive ones, says a team of researchers from the California Institute of Technology (Caltech), Scripps College, Princeton University, and the University of Iowa. This appears to be particularly true when voters have little or no information about a politician aside from their physical appearance.
Caltech and UNC Research Finds Further Evidence for Genetic Contribution to Autism
07/15/2008

Caltech and UNC Research Finds Further Evidence for Genetic Contribution to Autism

Kathy Svitil
Some parents of children with autism evaluate facial expressions differently than the rest of us--and in a way that is strikingly similar to autistic patients themselves, according to new research by neuroscientist Ralph Adolphs of the California Institute of Technology and psychiatrist Joe Piven at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Caltech Researchers Reveal the Neuronal Computations Governing Strategic Social Interactions in the Human Brain
05/19/2008

Caltech Researchers Reveal the Neuronal Computations Governing Strategic Social Interactions in the Human Brain

Kathy Svitil
In a strategic game, the success of any player depends not just on his or her own actions, but on the behavior of every other player in the game. To be successful, players must not only pay attention to what other players do, but also how they are thinking.
How Fairness Is Wired in the Brain
05/08/2008

How Fairness Is Wired in the Brain

elisabeth nadin
In the biblical story in which two women bring a baby to King Solomon, both claiming to be the mother, he suggests dividing the child so that each woman can have half. Solomon's proposed solution, meant to reveal the real mother, also illustrates an issue central to economics and moral philosophy: how to distribute goods fairly.
Two Faculty Members Join American Academy of Arts and Sciences
04/30/2008

Two Faculty Members Join American Academy of Arts and Sciences

elisabeth nadin
Caltech professors Michael Dickinson and Thomas Palfrey are among the 190 new fellows elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences this year. They join an assembly that was founded in 1780 by John Adams, James Bowdoin, John Hancock, and other scholars to provide practical solutions to pressing issues.
placeholder
Locating a "Free Choice" Brain Circuit
04/16/2008

Locating a "Free Choice" Brain Circuit

elisabeth nadin
Your brain gets a better workout when you change your routine, say scientists at the California Institute of Technology who have pinpointed one particular circuit that activates your ability to execute a decision. This finding may help drive research in neural prosthetics and in how unhealthy decisions are made.
Caltech logo on dark blue green background
Sixth Annual Caltech Science Writing Symposium
02/25/2008

Sixth Annual Caltech Science Writing Symposium

Deborah Williams-Hedges
California Institute of Technology President Jean-Lou Chameau and Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Usha Lee McFarling will be the featured speakers at the sixth annual Caltech Science Writing Symposium. The topic of their conversation will be the importance and challenges of communicating science to the general public.
Wine Study Shows Price Influences Perception
01/14/2008

Wine Study Shows Price Influences Perception

Kathy Svitil
A rose by any other name might smell as sweet, but slap on a hefty price tag, and our opinion of it might go through the roof. At least that's the case with the taste of wine, say scientists from the California Institute of Technology and Stanford University.
placeholder
Attractiveness Is Its Own Reward
12/03/2007

Attractiveness Is Its Own Reward

Kathy Svitil
Studies of the snap judgments we often make about people are shedding new light not only on social behavior, but also on drug abuse, gambling addiction, and other disorders in which our ability to make decisions is impaired, say scientists at the California Institute of Technology.
Certain Types of Brain Damage Can Improve Utilitarian Moral Judgments, Research Shows
03/21/2007

Certain Types of Brain Damage Can Improve Utilitarian Moral Judgments, Research Shows

Robert Tindol
Quick response! What's the best thing to do on a lifeboat with one too many people on board? Should one throw a mortally injured person overboard to ensure definite survival for everyone else, or refuse to act and ensure certain death for all individuals in the boat?
Caltech logo on dark blue green background